Unbuilt – A farmer’s abode – A Tiny House for a Farmer, by Studio unTAG

Text and Images: Studio unTAG

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OUR BRIEF – to design an affordable mobile tiny house for a ‘kisaan’, a farmer, from central India, as the Client. The design is based on the idea of Build, Live and Earn, thus promoting a sustainable lifestyle for a farmer.

Tiny House 01 - Studio unTAGPLANNING – The house is envisaged as two cuboids, one public, one private, separated by a small green court inbetween, while connected by a stair. The 3M high Living+Kitchen cuboid overlooks this court as the immediate view ensuring privacy when needed. The two shorter sides of the living can drop down to become two cantilevered decks, connecting the inside to the outside, also channelizing the breezes to flow through the house. The second cuboid, 5m high, houses a toilet on lower level, and a bedspace on the upper level.

STRATEGY APPLICATION – A kisaan could place this tiny abode anywhere on his farm, work here, rest here. He could also tow the house to a nearby town, to sell his yield directly to the end user, where the house transforms into his shop. He could also transfigure it into a homestay by inviting citydwellers to stay here, establishing a symbiotic relation, where the guests learn / live a countryside farm life while the farmer earns by hosting them.

Tiny House 01 - Studio unTAG

CONSTRUCT – The house is built as a composite of locally available wooden framework with easily replacable bamboo infill panels, resting on a sturdy MS I-frame. The floor and ceiling is made of light weight fibre reinforced cement panels(aerocon), walls internally finished in chipboard. The entire house is envisaged as a Dry Construct, to curb damage during mobility. Modular / foldable seating, beds, tables, chairs ensure space optimization / functional adaptability.

SUSTAINABLE MEASURES

• Optimized footprint, multi-functional / adaptive spaces

• Efficient Structural Grid spans with conventional construction techniques

• Cross ventilated spaces, with necessary overhangs

• Well insulated / cost effective borax treated bamboo infill panels

• Locally available / Light weight materials with lesser embodied-energy

• Hydrophonic vegetation grown in troughs as a Green Roof

• Additional layer of thermal insulation through Green Roof

• Detachable Solar Panels installed on roof

• Green court with reed bed for waste water cleansing

• House rested on 4 pedestals, without diturbing the natural ground

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