As all of talk is nothing more than just a bark for the Council of Architecture. – Ar. Manish Mishra

Editor At ALive!

Editor At ALive!

Text by: Ar. Manish Mishra

It has been long that I have been thinking and writing about possible reforms at Council of Architecture. I have realized writing many letters and having arguments and discussions with fellow professionals regarding legalities and common grounds of fairness in the profession of Architecture hasn’t lead to a clarity of thought at the decision-making level.

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It has been long that I have been thinking and writing about possible reforms at Council of Architecture. I have realized writing many letters and having arguments and discussions with fellow professionals regarding legalities and common grounds of fairness in the profession of Architecture hasn’t lead to a clarity of thought at the decision-making level.

Yesterday I was told that the new list of approvals has been uploaded at Council of Architecture official webpage. Seeing it I realized that till May 31st Council has been able to issue the extension of approval to only 4 out of 35 plus colleges of Architecture in entire U.P. with the reduced intake. In the entire country, it was a similar situation.

What was more noticeable that, still the only one-year extension of approval was issued to all the institutes, which had been inspected in this current season of inspection.

Then I realized how mute and undeniably subservient our community of Architects and Architectural Institutions is…that they are chained with a body, which is free to design syllabus, setup norms, inspect and charge for the same…which has forced its failures to regulate the education upon the Architects and Architecture institutions themselves.

I realized, that we are chained and so we feel that’s our destiny.

I realized, what possible harm it would do to an Architect to openly go and confront the decision makers who cannot think of better way to regulate the profession, despite all the powers given to them and when they are repeatedly being elected in one position or other?

I was reminded that in next year possibly Certificate of Practice will come into existence and with that, there will not be regular inspection…I ask then why the only one year of extension of approval, i.e. for the year 2018-19?

Why it cannot be like all taxpayers file taxes and then out of all taxation reports only 10% is taken for scrutiny. It can be a random scrutiny and anyone can be inspected at any point of the year and only 10% may be inspected, while everyone has to file its report.

There is approval till there is no disapproval.

Then I realized…

I should give up trying to make them hear….to those decision makers…who think of themselves as guardians of chains tied around necks of each of us.

As all of the talks are nothing more than just bark for them…


Views expressed in the above article are those of the author and do not represent the opinion of ArchitectureLive! / ArchiSHOTS

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