HKS House at Vishakhapatnam, AndhraPradesh, by SDeG Architects

SDeG Architecture

SDeG Architecture

Text: SDeG architects

HKS house is located uphill in a quiet residential neighborhood in Visakhapatnam. The owners wanted a home with clearly delineated private spaces for the family, and a separate block to host guests and events. The building is therefore conceived as two programmed volumes held together by a bridge-corridor, landscaped courts, and shaded terraces.

Share Post:

Share on facebook
Share on linkedin
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email

HKS House - SDeGHKS house is located uphill in a quiet residential neighborhood in Visakhapatnam. The owners wanted a home with clearly delineated private spaces for the family, and a separate block to host guests and events. The building is therefore conceived as two programmed volumes held together by a bridge-corridor, landscaped courts, and shaded terraces.

At the ground level, the owners can park, meet visitors at a home-office and organize shows at the gallery. Guests are either led up to an entry stairway to the verandah, or towards the north lawns for a celebration. The northern volume also holds a formal living room, a covered deck for brunches and whirlpool bath-lounge, for the children and their guests. The eastern court and bridge together form the pivot of the home. It is both open and enclosed, and offers varying degrees of interaction between the private and public areas of the building. The bridges (on first and second floor) are capped with a large coffered floor that forms a façade recess, causing a low pressure zone, forcing the north easterlies through the core of the house.

HKS House - SDeG
Concept Animation

The second volume includes five large bedrooms along the southern edge, all reaching out to either capture views or winds from the Bay of Bengal. On level one, the old and young meet in the family lounge and western deck. This block also includes a double-height formal dining room, kitchens, utility spaces and staff accommodation.

HKS house has deep overhangs, thick edges and wrap around greens, intended to keep a large internal volume as cool as possible. The exterior faces are rendered in smooth white and granular grey (cement plaster panels); mild textures to attenuate the effects of saline air and coal dust from the port nearby.

Drawings:

Project Facts:

Project name: HKS House
Architect’ Firm: SDeG
Website: www.sdeg.in

Design Lead: Sujit Nair, Balaji T
Project Team: Sujit, Balaji, Hari Krishna, Pratibha, Gayathri, Shoaib, Siddharth
Project location: Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India
Google Map Location – https://goo.gl/n6PSD4
Completion Year: 2017
Gross Built Area (square meters or square foot): 1364 m2

Photo credits: Shamanth Patil
Photographer’s website: www.raysandgreys.com

Other participants

Structural Consultant – ISA Consultants
Electrical Consultant – PK Consultants
Interior Contractor-Krafts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

You May Also Like

Framed House, at Bangalore, India, by Crest Architects

Framed House, at Bangalore, India, by Crest Architects

Located within a gated community in North Bangalore, the square-shaped plot of this residence abuts the road on the southern and western sides and enjoys views of the encompassing greenery. Based on the client’s requirements, our approach was to design a modest house with a specific emphasis on natural light and ventilation.  

Read More »

TIGER TIGER – Nisha Mathew Ghosh

TIGER TIGER is part of a series on animals and their implied symbolic narrative appropriated politically and socially. This series studies the perception of people and conjures up new imaginaries as form is divested of its power by dematerializing it via the act of weaving a narrative shorn of the power, panache, swagger associated with the cultural, symbolic or naturalized form. – Nisha Mathew Ghosh

Read More »
Conserving The Commissariat Bulding, DR DN Road, by Vikas Dilawari

Conserving The Commissariat Building, DR DN Road, by Vikas Dilawari

Mumbai was the first city in India to have heritage regulations to protect its living heritage. This listing and the corresponding regulations binding these precincts would also protect these old areas from burdening the fragile infrastructure with high-rise buildings. These precincts, more than individual structures, puts forward each city’s uniqueness. Heritage awareness is certainly increasing on paper with more nominations of World Heritage Site ensembles. But in reality, its protection on the ground is decreasing at an alarming rate.

Read More »

“A Sense of Space: This book is an invitation to liberate oneself from the valorised image of western or imperial city planning towards a more nuanced, indigenous, and flexible approach to our cities.” Sudipto Ghosh Reviews A Sense of Space, by Ranjit Sabikhi

Those wondering why the design of contemporary Indian cities is such an arduous and joyless affair will find Ranjit Sabikhi’s book of immense interest. Many may even find themselves jolted to action within their spheres of influence despite the book’s unflappable tone. Most importantly, this book is an invitation to liberate oneself from the valorised image of western or imperial city planning towards a more nuanced, indigenous, and flexible approach to our cities. – Sudipto Ghosh

Read More »

Highway Restaurants Concept, at New Delhi, by Parag Singal Architects

The stirring proposal of Highway Bridge Restaurant was conceptualized by Parag Singal Architects. The idea is to build restaurants over National Highways that can be accessed from both sides of the road. Located on the center of the highway, it is almost impossible for the restaurant to go unnoticed by the motorists. It offers more visibility to the restaurant and makes it easier for the traveler to spot a place for refreshment, hence creating a win-win situation. – Parag Singal Architects

Read More »
MA001, at Ayroor, Kerala, India, by mamama

MA001, at Ayroor, Kerala, India, by mamama

Located in Ayroor, Kerala this family home that sits on the banks of the Chalakudy river is nothing less than a mini-ecosystem within itself — self-sufficient and symbiotic. Using local masons, carpenters, contractors and construction methods, this home was completed with natural materials such as terracotta and laterite tiles, kota stone and terracotta jaali blocks. A generous verandah wraps around three sides and a large open terrace on the upper floor maximises the spectacular views out onto the river. The house is an extension of the clients’ (perfect) idea of living a retired life.

Read More »

Subscribe to Architecture and Design Updates