Interior Design: Dubai Villa by Aum Architects, Mumbai

Text and images by architect
The architectural design of the villa has been adapted in a  contemporary style with a strong influence of modernism. The planning has been deciphered from ‘Hortus Conclusus’, which is the latin term for ‘an enclosed / walled garden with a water body at the centre’, thus exhibiting greenery as the nucleus of the villa.

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Interior Design: Dubai Villa by Aum Architects, Mumbai 3

Villa at Dubai by Aum Architects

The architectural design of the villa has been adapted in a contemporary style with a strong influence of modernism. The planning has been deciphered from ‘Hortus Conclusus’, which is the latin term for ‘an enclosed / walled garden with a water body at the centre’, thus exhibiting greenery as the nucleus of the villa. Due to its location and physiological factors, the villa is structured in a way to create vistas into the centre; overlooking hugely landscaped area from all sides, encasing the villa into an expanse of green. Being true to the conceived concept, It is also adorned with a swimming pool at the focal point. The ingenuity of the architecture transcends into the interior design of the villa. The voluminous space is evenly flanked into three levels with the basement being used for utilitarian purpose. It accommodates staff rooms, gymnasium, sauna and a luxurious home theatre for recreation.

Ground Floor:
The ground floor is assigned for more social and interactive spaces to be entered with a double height foyer designed with intricate lighting and art sculpture set across halls.

The first floor is purposely consorted to a private area, condescended by bedrooms and the family rooms. Infusing the luminous essence of natural light, the composition of the ground floor enables flooding of ample daylighting thus revitalizing the livable quarters.

The elevator has also been pivoted to get the panoramic view of the pool, embellished in the centre, acting as the courtyard of the villa. This also blurs the boundaries of the inside and outside giving the users a connect with their surrounding. The glass capsule lift is projected out of the structure making it an accentuating feature of the facade. Stepping into the elevator transports you solely to a vibrant walled garden.

The material palette inculcated aids to amplify the magnanimity of the interior arenas making it look luxurious and boundless and giving it the grandeur of a villa. Elements like, the delicate tinted glass partition that runs along the double height in the foyer, have been incorporated to give a sneak to the visitor of what beholds inside. The flooring has been kept glossy and dark to add contrast with subtle hues of bespoke furniture. The larger than life living room, has two disparately placed seatings; one being formal at the extreme end of the living room the other one, more centrally located. Gold accents adding a touch of luxury are seen in the flooring as in-lays, in the ceiling as gilding and also in the furniture. The dining is a 14 seater one, a custom made crystal light feature that merges with the ribbon like wooden structure which runs diagonally from the ceiling to form the partition that separates dining from living. Artworks throughout the villa have also been planned strategically to compliment the interiors rather than just making it a separate entity acting as an embellishment. Indoor plants are used in the dining area to break the rigidity of exquisite materials used.

All the bedrooms are tastefully done to match each each users characteristic. Thus, making each room unique with similar services. Warm tonnes of walnut, with hints of gold along with a wall treatments / cladding in subtle grey can be seen throughout the common areas.

The design of this villa exquisitely composes the requisite contemporary vibe, sprinkling it with an aura of charming greens and a plush semblance.

Drawings:

Images:

 

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