Kecherile Veedu, at Kecheri, Thrissur, Kerala, by Finder Studio

Finderstudio

Finderstudio

Traditional Kerala homes are rich in memories; of the long-forgotten smell of the first rain, the sound of raindrops falling in the courtyard, people sitting and conversing around it, the feeling of the warmth of mud walls and wood,  the coziness of spaces;  one may find him or herself drifting into their nostalgic memories of yesteryears every once in a while. - Finder Studio

Categories:

Share Post:

Share on facebook
Share on linkedin
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email

Kecherile Veedu, at Kecheri, Thrissur, Kerala, by Finder Studio 1

Traditional Kerala homes are rich in memories; of the long-forgotten smell of the first rain, the sound of raindrops falling in the courtyard, people sitting and conversing around it, the feeling of the warmth of mud walls and wood,  the coziness of spaces;  one may find him or herself drifting into their nostalgic memories of yesteryears every once in a while.

‘Kecheriyile Veedu’ is an attempt at recalling these memories.

As a home for an elderly couple enjoying their retirement, all the spaces are limited to a single floor, easing their movement within the house.  Despite being tightly packed in an odd-shaped 11 cent plot, the two triangular sky courts make the spaces airy and well lit. These courts are flanked by a long wall facing west, having bricks arranged in a certain pattern forming a  series of perforations and projections to catch the wind and block the harsh west sun.

A typical single storey structure attracts more heat gain than its multistorey counterparts. To address this issue, we used two layers of roofing: a flat slab spanning the interior spaces and a truss roof stretching over the entire structure, thus creating an interspace in between which absorbs most of the heat.

The reminiscent of a distant past; the material palette for the Kecheri house is essentially earth tones:- brick, stained concrete, cement plaster, and wood.

Drawings –

Project Facts –

Project Name: Kecherile Veedu
Office Name:  Finder Studio
Firm Location: Trivandrum, Kerala, India
Completion Year: 2020
Gross Built Area:1520 sqft
Project Location: Kecheri, Trissur
Program: Residential
Lead Architects: Jayakrishnan RJ, Levin P joy, Naveen S
Design Team: Albin Joseph, Meenakshi Ajith, Sachu James
Photo Credits: Prasanth Mohan

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

You May Also Like

Framed House, at Bangalore, India, by Crest Architects

Framed House, at Bangalore, India, by Crest Architects

Located within a gated community in North Bangalore, the square-shaped plot of this residence abuts the road on the southern and western sides and enjoys views of the encompassing greenery. Based on the client’s requirements, our approach was to design a modest house with a specific emphasis on natural light and ventilation.  

Read More »

TIGER TIGER – Nisha Mathew Ghosh

TIGER TIGER is part of a series on animals and their implied symbolic narrative appropriated politically and socially. This series studies the perception of people and conjures up new imaginaries as form is divested of its power by dematerializing it via the act of weaving a narrative shorn of the power, panache, swagger associated with the cultural, symbolic or naturalized form. – Nisha Mathew Ghosh

Read More »
Conserving The Commissariat Bulding, DR DN Road, by Vikas Dilawari

Conserving The Commissariat Building, DR DN Road, by Vikas Dilawari

Mumbai was the first city in India to have heritage regulations to protect its living heritage. This listing and the corresponding regulations binding these precincts would also protect these old areas from burdening the fragile infrastructure with high-rise buildings. These precincts, more than individual structures, puts forward each city’s uniqueness. Heritage awareness is certainly increasing on paper with more nominations of World Heritage Site ensembles. But in reality, its protection on the ground is decreasing at an alarming rate.

Read More »

“A Sense of Space: This book is an invitation to liberate oneself from the valorised image of western or imperial city planning towards a more nuanced, indigenous, and flexible approach to our cities.” Sudipto Ghosh Reviews A Sense of Space, by Ranjit Sabikhi

Those wondering why the design of contemporary Indian cities is such an arduous and joyless affair will find Ranjit Sabikhi’s book of immense interest. Many may even find themselves jolted to action within their spheres of influence despite the book’s unflappable tone. Most importantly, this book is an invitation to liberate oneself from the valorised image of western or imperial city planning towards a more nuanced, indigenous, and flexible approach to our cities. – Sudipto Ghosh

Read More »

Highway Restaurants Concept, at New Delhi, by Parag Singal Architects

The stirring proposal of Highway Bridge Restaurant was conceptualized by Parag Singal Architects. The idea is to build restaurants over National Highways that can be accessed from both sides of the road. Located on the center of the highway, it is almost impossible for the restaurant to go unnoticed by the motorists. It offers more visibility to the restaurant and makes it easier for the traveler to spot a place for refreshment, hence creating a win-win situation. – Parag Singal Architects

Read More »
MA001, at Ayroor, Kerala, India, by mamama

MA001, at Ayroor, Kerala, India, by mamama

Located in Ayroor, Kerala this family home that sits on the banks of the Chalakudy river is nothing less than a mini-ecosystem within itself — self-sufficient and symbiotic. Using local masons, carpenters, contractors and construction methods, this home was completed with natural materials such as terracotta and laterite tiles, kota stone and terracotta jaali blocks. A generous verandah wraps around three sides and a large open terrace on the upper floor maximises the spectacular views out onto the river. The house is an extension of the clients’ (perfect) idea of living a retired life.

Read More »

Subscribe to Architecture and Design Updates