Reality vs Storytelling: A case of architectural representation – Pulkit Soni

Pulkit Soni

Pulkit Soni

Share Post:

Share on facebook
Share on linkedin
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email

Pulkit Soni weighs in on Photoshopped Architecture and talks about the role of storytelling in architecture and conceptual conveyance. Below:


As a final year student, I did my dissertation research on the domain of concepts in architecture. One significant area of study in my research was storytelling in architecture. I somehow relate rendering to the idea of storytelling – perhaps illustrations in a storybook would be the rendering, literally as well as figuratively so in the case of architecture.

I would share excerpts from my research here but, before I do that, I would like to share a couple of quotations that really impacted my thought process during the study.

Sometimes reality is too complex. Stories give it form.” – Jean Luc Godard
Storytelling reveals meaning without committing the error of defining it.” – Hannah Arendt

Now, from the dissertation:

Good stories always encourage engagement and engagement is what designers crave. Stories also create biases. Stories have the power to alter the thought without having any physical bearing. 

In architecture, a story may add value to the experience without any physical creation.

“When the cycle of storytelling is used in the creation of new designs, the result is a nonlinear narrative within the architecture which is open to continuous interpretation from the perspective of the occupant.”

Storytelling is something that comes naturally to all humans. We communicate not with numbers and details, but with approximation, generalization and exaggeration; glossing over the facts and emphasizing the inner desire of thought process to meet the abstract.

With the power of storytelling comes a larger responsibility. It is the responsibility to be honest, in a sense that the stories be relevant to the context, the site and the building that they accompany.

How we represent our buildings, particularly to the public, can greatly affect how the narrative is experienced. “Buildings are not simply understood through spatial experience.”

Public buildings or large-scale constructions often use the media to inform people about the conceptual framework to the design, giving a representation to the public, of how the architect wants people to interact with the intellectual properties of a building. This restricts the public’s ability to understand and interact with architecture in an autonomous way.

Photoshopped Architecture
Visual renderings in architecture act as a storytelling tool (Source: Alex Hogrefe, visualizingarchitecture.com)

The stories and words support what is being told by the architecture and generate a quest in the users to search. Stories are also about making-believe in the existence of something that isn’t there.

In reality projects are always constrained by things such as the site, the program, the budget and the construction. These have the real impact on the building being built and leave less space for other concepts to breathe hence stories come into the picture.

As designers, what we consciously or sub-consciously do through concepts, stories and rendering, is manipulate our clients or the possible users of the space. To be able to achieve more through these it would be handy to study consumer behaviour taking clients as the consumer and architecture as the commodity. I did do some peripheral research on that too, which could be summarized as the following:

An ideal architectural narrative would encompass all the factors to create an experience just like the ideal consumer experience in the world of marketing.

I think we as architects need to stop looking at rendering and photoshopped images with the lens of ethics. The discussion surrounding ethics becomes meaningless and doesn’t help the cause of architecture.


One Reply to “Reality vs Storytelling: A case of architectural representation – Pulkit Soni”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

You May Also Like

4 BHK Apartment at, Ahmedabad, by Shayona Consultant

4 BHK Apartment at, Ahmedabad, by Shayona Consultant

The client simplified his requirement with-“a calm space, using fewer colors and more simplicity with materials, with maximum possible storage, light and ventilation.” This is 4 bedroom apartment, converted into 3bhk with another room as workspace.

Entering through a small vestibule one is impressed with – “The overall aesthetic of the home that is, one of openness, where spaces are multi-functional without crowding the overall layout of drawing, living and dining.” – Prashant Parmar Architect and Shayona Consultant

Read More »

The Bombay House, at South Mumbai, by RC Architects

The Bombay house is a unique typology that has existed since the colonial times. The space is restored and redesigned to its true time but creating opportunities and interactions for today’s use. A unique blend of time and function. The sequence of spaces within the house forms a loop. One enters the house in a library and then moves through a verandah to reach the living spaces. A passage from the living room leads to the bedrooms and the kitchen. Through the bedroom one again reaches the verandah that completes the loop. The design interventions intersect within this sequence enhancing the experience and creating opportunities within the house. – RC Architects

Read More »
Framed House, at Bangalore, India, by Crest Architects

Framed House, at Bangalore, India, by Crest Architects

Located within a gated community in North Bangalore, the square-shaped plot of this residence abuts the road on the southern and western sides and enjoys views of the encompassing greenery. Based on the client’s requirements, our approach was to design a modest house with a specific emphasis on natural light and ventilation.  

Read More »

TIGER TIGER – Nisha Mathew Ghosh

TIGER TIGER is part of a series on animals and their implied symbolic narrative appropriated politically and socially. This series studies the perception of people and conjures up new imaginaries as form is divested of its power by dematerializing it via the act of weaving a narrative shorn of the power, panache, swagger associated with the cultural, symbolic or naturalized form. – Nisha Mathew Ghosh

Read More »
Conserving The Commissariat Bulding, DR DN Road, by Vikas Dilawari

Conserving The Commissariat Building, DR DN Road, by Vikas Dilawari

Mumbai was the first city in India to have heritage regulations to protect its living heritage. This listing and the corresponding regulations binding these precincts would also protect these old areas from burdening the fragile infrastructure with high-rise buildings. These precincts, more than individual structures, puts forward each city’s uniqueness. Heritage awareness is certainly increasing on paper with more nominations of World Heritage Site ensembles. But in reality, its protection on the ground is decreasing at an alarming rate.

Read More »

Subscribe to Architecture and Design Updates