Turning to stone at Stone – Print Villa, at Utter Pradesh, by Sian Architects

Sian Architects

Sian Architects

Flanked by the archaeological ruins of Vidura and Hastinapur and the idealistic ‘shiny’ urbanity of New Delhi, Meerut often finds itself in a ‘dilemma of identity’. Over time, the culture of the city, the notion of its inhabitants and the built environment has persistently deconstructed so much so that it has lost much of its contextual ‘evenness’. This traction between ‘nostalgia’ and ‘aspiration’ is especially visible in the old neighbourhoods or ‘mohallas’ of the city, which incidentally also becomes an active background for the vision behind Stone-Print Villa. - Sian Architects

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Stone Print Villa, at Utter Pradesh, by Sian Architects

 

BACKGROUND

Flanked by the archaeological ruins of Vidura and Hastinapur and the idealistic ‘shiny’ urbanity of New Delhi, Meerut often finds itself in a ‘dilemma of identity’. Over time, the culture of the city, the notion of its inhabitants and the built environment has persistently deconstructed so much so that it has lost much of its contextual ‘evenness’. This traction between ‘nostalgia’ and ‘aspiration’ is especially visible in the old neighbourhoods or ‘mohallas’ of the city, which incidentally also becomes an active background for the vision behind Stone-Print Villa.

 

Situated on a narrow cul-de-sac in an old neighbourhood of the city, stone-print is a part of what was once a large living quarter occupied by related members of a mercantile community. Over time, various members have moved out and the living quarters have broken down into smaller residences. However, the occupants of Stone-print villa have vehemently held onto their ancestral land. This perpetual association with the land is almost ‘reverential’ and the brief simply asked to portray this relationship in an extremely bold and visible manner through the façade. It asked for an aesthetic that doesn’t shy away, has a powerful presence and unfolds as an ‘artefact’ representing the occupant’s unyielding connection with their ‘home’.

 

 

ARCHITECTURE

While curating the façade, the studio chose to retain the existing structure and decided to approach it as a canvas that could be ‘cladded’. Two Indian natural stones were chosen for their similar yellow colour tones and durable structural profiles. Inherently smooth, the stones were processed with varying degrees of sand-blasting techniques to achieve textural-rough surfaces. Additionally, it was realised that the chips from the base stone when mixed with resin led to a flexible stone-resin prototype, ideal for micro-detailing and ornamentations. Polished, rough, mango and pale yellow samples were eventually curated out of the same base materials, subsequently opening up various cladding possibilities.

 

This allowed for a heavily ornated plinth composed of stone-resin panels cut in stepped patterns, wrapping endlessly around the masonry. In complete contrast, the upper storeys were seamlessly ‘cladded’ with a relatively pale sand-blasted version, leaving an over-arching and dominant presence on the street. Terrace projections were also accentuated with layered stone cladding to overstate the scale of the house and exaggerate it to an almost unacceptable boundary. The elevation is warm-toned and strictly traditional with layers of patterns rendered as a unique expression of architecture.

 

Apart from the bold material choice, the façade is designed as an ‘art piece’ to achieve the envisioned imageability and presence. Hence, it is deliberately ornated with numerous hand-crafted and 3D-printed motifs inspired by the heritage of the residence, such as floral plates on the parapet and the boundary wall, peacock motifs, terrace corbels and columns. Ornamentation has been very carefully integrated such that it only appears from certain vantage points on the street and within the building, surprising the viewers without overwhelming them. A similar flamboyance is also adopted for the interiors where ornated walls, ceilings and patterned floorings reinforce the sensory experience created by the elevation.

 

At Stone-Print villa, a residential façade is unexpectedly pushed to a monumental status, more so with a material that has been pushed to an ornamentation eminence. Collectively, it becomes an exercise in fine-balance between varied concepts, smooth and rough, seamless and patterned, restraint and flamboyance, art and architecture and most importantly ‘nostalgia’ and ‘aspiration’.

 

 

 

Drawings –

Project Facts –

PROJECT NAME: STONE PRINT VILLA

LOCATION: MEERUT, UTTAR PRADESH, INDIA

AREA : 400sqyards / 3600sqft / 335sqmt

YEAR OF COMPLETION: 2020/2021

CATEGORY: ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIORS

ARCHITECTS: SIAN ARCHITECTS

LEAD ARCHITECTS: Surbhi Singhal, Deepanshu Arneja

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